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up in-demand enough to consider it a career. Every

time we sit around and feel sorry for ourselves for

our intense schedule, the challenges that face us

daily or how hard it’s all been, we come back to the

same point that neither of us actually expected it to

go this well ever.

Moto Guzzi V50 custom by Revival CyclesFull Size

The short answer: Follow your passion. And if your

passion happens to be motorcycles, and you have a

group of supportive and talented people around you,

and you’re the perfect combination of talented,

stubborn, willful,

confident and stupid,

then perhaps you

can stick through the

tough times and get

to some level of self-

sufficiency.

Wrenchmonkees:

First of all: make

your family and

friends believe in

you. Believe in

yourself and believe

in the decisions you

make. Stay humble,

work hard and

maintain your

integrity! Don’t think you can do everything yourself.

Team up with people who are better than you, and

don’t think that their strengths are your

weaknesses—just make sure you are on the same

mission!

Be stubborn and at the same time willing to make

sacrifices—but don’t price your work too low. Then

everything will be OK. (No promises, haha!)

What influences your current aesthetic and design

philosophy?

Hageman: My influences and designs come from

bikes I remembered when growing up in the ’70s and

’80s—bikes that I would sit and stare at in awe, just

waiting to get my hands on the next issue of the

latest motorcycle magazine. I rely on the memories

and draw from images left in my head, and work

towards those images that made me smile when I

was younger.

Yamaha XV750 Virago custom by Hageman

MotorcyclesFull Size

I like to combine those ideas and thoughts with

modern technology; I consider myself a mechanic

first, and designer after that. Simple, reliable

mechanics of the bike come first, then design

follows—I have no use for an un-ridable bike.

Pollock: My philosophy is a product of competition:

make it simpler, faster, lighter, more durable and

trouble-free. Twenty-three years in aerospace gets

you into the habit of paying attention to even the

smallest details that may never be seen—but I’ll

know that it’s right. Looking at other builders’ work,

simplicity in solutions is where the real talent is and

what I search for. Simple solutions are the biggest

influence, followed by

MotoGP and hot rods.

Stulberg: The balance I

try to achieve is a

combination of subtle

elegance and superior

functionality. I’ve found

that it’s easy to slap

together a brightly

colored, bedazzled

machine that has fancy

bright paint, knobby

tires, and flagrant

anodized gold-colored

accessories to catch

attention and Internet

‘notoriety.’

On the other hand, it’s also possible for a skilled

designer or sculptor to craft a fine piece of well-

proportioned art that will roll down the road OK, but

will certainly never go out and win even the easiest

of races or garner an effortless weekend of carving

up twisties on your favorite switchback road. I

believe it takes a metered, skilled and careful

approach to combine performance, design and

engineering to actually make a rolling sculpture

simultaneously astound the eyes AND perform better

than the average production machine.

Rogers: We’ve always believed in the mantra that

‘less is more’. What’s been really interesting over the

last couple of years is the increasing mix of sports

bikes that we’ve been asked to work on—models like

the Triumph 675 and KTM Super Duke have given us

the opportunity to diversify and push the

boundaries.

Iron Guerilla custom motorcycle by Rough CraftsFull

Size

Yeh: Cars, bikes, furniture, sculptures—everything

around me that was designed and made by humans

affects me every single day. As my brand Rough